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Do you know where your honey comes from?

MEET THE BEES THAT MAKE YOUR HONEY

They work together, dividing the work of the hive based on their age. First they clean the hive, then feed developing larva, then build honeycomb, and then ward off intruders.  Finally, at 4-6 weeks of age, their last job is to become foragers and leave the hive in search of flowers.

Honeybees are social 

Honeybees can fly up to 5 km and will visit up to 100 flowers per trip.  The flowers produce nectar to attract the bees, and in exchange  the flower benefits by spreading its pollen. The bees collect the nectar which they bring back to the hive and turn into honey.

THEIR WINGS BEAT AT 230 BEATS/SECOND

Bees and other insects pollinate one third of the food that we eat.    Their furry bodies and pollen baskets allow them to carry pollen back to the hive, as a source of protein.  As bees fly from flower to flower, some grains of pollen rub off onto the flowers' pistils.  This allows the flower to develop into fruit and seeds.  

BEES MAKE MORE

THAN HONEY

Honeybees visit 2 million flowers to make 1 lb of honey

Returning home,  honeybees  store nectar in honeycomb cells they've built from beeswax.  Using the heat of the hive, the bees dehydrate nectar into honey.  Honey  contains natural sugars, water, vitamins, antioxidants, enzymes, and minerals.  

We want you to know where your honey comes from, 

that it's 100% pure,

local, and sustainably produced by people who love their bees.

That's why we created

to connect you to the bees that make your honey

In Partnership with